The Burning of Cork, 1920

On the night of 11-12 December 1920 members of two Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) units, the Special Reserve and Auxiliary Division, shot burned and looted their way through parts of Cork city centre killing and wounding a number of people and causing damage estimated at $194m/€175m (in today’s value). In the immediate aftermath much of the press, particularly the British press, either claimed no-one was able to identify those involved or else attributed to the violence to ‘Sinn Feiners’ (meaning the IRA).

In the days after Cork was burnt by the Black and Tans (as the RIC’s Special Reserve was known) and Auxies (as the Auxiliary Division was known), English newspapers like the The Graphic reported merely that ‘incendiaries’ had set fire to the city. The Illustrated London News claimed it was “impossible to say” which ‘faction’ was responsible but that citizens had requested that General Strickland deploy military patrols to guard the city centre. Within a couple of days, Sir Hamar Greenwood, the British government’s Chief Secretary for Ireland, went even further. He explicitly denied any involvement of the British forces and, instead, unequivocally blamed the burnings on the IRA.

Below, you can see a selection of photographs of the aftermath in Cork as published in contemporary newspapers.

The Graphic, 18 Dec 1920

Another image from The Graphic, 18 Dec 1920

Full page image from The Graphic, 18 Dec 1920

Illustrated London News, 18 Dec 1920

A burned out tramcar, Leeds Mercury 16 Dec 1920

The Sphere, 18 Dec 1920

Sheffield Independent, 15 Dec 1920

Another image of the destruction from Sheffield Independent, 15 Dec 1920

The response was to get Professor Alfred O’Rahilly (of University College Cork) to produce a book containing eye-witness accounts of events over the night of 11-12 December 1920, which were published in January 1921 under the name of the Irish Labour Party and Trade Union Congress. The book was called Who Burnt Cork City? (you can get a copy here). It so successfully counteracted the propaganda put out in the English press that it was to be the model for the Facts and Figures of the Belfast Pogrom which was to appear in August 1922 (also now back in print).

2 responses to “The Burning of Cork, 1920

  1. Thaks for this . I sent it to Gabriel Docherty in UCC History Dept in UCC as information.

    The sent this back (as information).

    “The British cabinet subsequently received the report from General Strickland into the burnings, which unequivocally pointed the finger of blame at the Auxiliaries – and the cabinet decided that because publication would have such a devastating impact upon the morale of Crown forces, it would have to be suppressed!!”

    Le gach dea-mhéin/ Best wishes,

    Féilim

    Dr. Féilim Ó hAdhmaill,

    Scoil na Staidéar Sóisialta Feidhmeach/School of Applied Social Studies,

    Coláiste na hOllscoile Chorcaí/ University College Cork.

    Email: f.ohadhmaill@ucc.ie

    Tel: (00353) 021490 2616

    http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/A012/fohadhmaill

    Eolas ar/Information on the Masters in Voluntary and Community Sector Management

    http://www.ucc.ie/en/cke75/

    ________________________________

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.